thestrangerskiss:


By a spring-fed pool by Irulana 
This new addition to our Legendary Crossovers is possibly the first artwork about the Florian and Jonquil legend, and is based on a passage in A Storm of Swords describing when Ser Florian the Fool first encounters young Jonquil bathing in Maidenpool, currently our only information about its purported origins. 
Sansa scripts significant parts of the events in her life after this favourite story of hers in the first books, most famously the Ser Dontos scheme, whom she calls her Florian that will help her escape, unaware of who the real Florian figure in her life is, to whom she’ll later make the offer to sing this same song, again not knowing what he’s insinuating in reality. Both incidents illustrate GRRM’s use of dramatic irony through twisting the knightly archetype contained in the song: her “Florian” won’t engage a giant for her like the legendary knight-jester did for his lady, but will instead drop her in the lap of a metaphorical “giant” for gold. Meanwhile, the man she doesn’t yet consciously associate with Florian is the one that takes risks to aid her—and might continue to do so in the future—all the while making fun of all those songs and knights she loves. The song also works subconsciously on him, for after rejecting it and pounding tirelessly on the hypocritical and unrealistic nature of the knightly ideals, he adopts this song as his, one that he’d been promised and wants to hear from her. We may not know the entire contents of the story, but we do possess interesting clues from which to draw conclusions; and to ascertain that it’s no coincidence at all that the song appears most frequently in the arcs of the true non-knights and no true knights, those characters who struggle with the ideals and realities of knighthood: Sandor and Sansa, Brienne and Jaime, and Duncan the Tall.

thestrangerskiss:

By a spring-fed pool by Irulana 

This new addition to our Legendary Crossovers is possibly the first artwork about the Florian and Jonquil legend, and is based on a passage in A Storm of Swords describing when Ser Florian the Fool first encounters young Jonquil bathing in Maidenpool, currently our only information about its purported origins.

Sansa scripts significant parts of the events in her life after this favourite story of hers in the first books, most famously the Ser Dontos scheme, whom she calls her Florian that will help her escape, unaware of who the real Florian figure in her life is, to whom she’ll later make the offer to sing this same song, again not knowing what he’s insinuating in reality. Both incidents illustrate GRRM’s use of dramatic irony through twisting the knightly archetype contained in the song: her “Florian” won’t engage a giant for her like the legendary knight-jester did for his lady, but will instead drop her in the lap of a metaphorical “giant” for gold. Meanwhile, the man she doesn’t yet consciously associate with Florian is the one that takes risks to aid her—and might continue to do so in the future—all the while making fun of all those songs and knights she loves. The song also works subconsciously on him, for after rejecting it and pounding tirelessly on the hypocritical and unrealistic nature of the knightly ideals, he adopts this song as his, one that he’d been promised and wants to hear from her. We may not know the entire contents of the story, but we do possess interesting clues from which to draw conclusions; and to ascertain that it’s no coincidence at all that the song appears most frequently in the arcs of the true non-knights and no true knights, those characters who struggle with the ideals and realities of knighthood: Sandor and Sansa, Brienne and Jaime, and Duncan the Tall.

thefeatherofhope:

Soo since this community has been so good to me, I’ve decided to celebrate an important milestone in my life with a Sansan giveaway! 
I’ll  begin by giving everyone who reblogs this post the opportunity to win this fabulous work depicting the "Unkiss" from Metalshell, aka Nachan on DA. Thank you my dear, this is just gorgeous! Please do check out her other works, she truly is a fantastic artist.
I ask that you please reblog to a reasonable degree, for while I appreciate everyone’s enthusiasm, we don’t want to bother our followers with overkill, so to speak.
On September 17, I will use a random number generator to select a winner of both the digital and traditional watercolor versions of this work. To participate, I only ask that you already follow me or bighound-littlebird and that the rights to this commission please be respected. 
More prizes will follow for the rest of the month. Enjoy the Sansan goodness my lovelies!

thefeatherofhope:

Soo since this community has been so good to me, I’ve decided to celebrate an important milestone in my life with a Sansan giveaway! 

I’ll  begin by giving everyone who reblogs this post the opportunity to win this fabulous work depicting the "Unkiss" from Metalshell, aka Nachan on DA. Thank you my dear, this is just gorgeous! Please do check out her other works, she truly is a fantastic artist.

I ask that you please reblog to a reasonable degree, for while I appreciate everyone’s enthusiasm, we don’t want to bother our followers with overkill, so to speak.

On September 17, I will use a random number generator to select a winner of both the digital and traditional watercolor versions of this work. To participate, I only ask that you already follow me or bighound-littlebird and that the rights to this commission please be respected. 

More prizes will follow for the rest of the month. Enjoy the Sansan goodness my lovelies!

sansanfanart:

Sansa Stark in the Goodswood of the Red Keep by RobotDelEspacio

burningatomicsky:

Hodor

(Source: derekfuego)

galleryofthrones:

House of Stark.http://kehchoonwee.deviantart.com/art/House-of-Stark-477561071
kallielef:

Have a long ways to go with this one, death by armor. 

kallielef:

Have a long ways to go with this one, death by armor. 

katemarzullo:

I still have 20 minutes left of Game of Thrones Thursday, so I just wanted to quickly point out this shot… As a director, I am obviously very interested in shot composition, and this one recently got my attention. Specifically, the placement of each character in the frame (this is cropped a bit to illustrate my point). Sansa in the middle with her back to us — specifically her back draped in the Hound’s cloak. And Tyrion to her right, her future husband, helping her up, but the Hound placed right in the middle of them, directly facing Sansa (in fact they both seem deliberately angled toward one another). Then there’s Joffrey, her betrothed (at the time), to her left but the farthest figure in proximity to her. Interesting…
For those who have read the books, I’d like to point out the dream Sansa has that features all 3 of these men — you know the one I mean — in relation to the composition of this shot…
i read somewhere recently that his giving Sansa’s his cloak symbolized his shifting allegiance from Joffrey to her. There’s also the obvious reference — the “cloaking” of a bride by her groom at Westerosi wedding ceremonies. (In the books, he gives her his cloak again, at the Battle of Blackwater, only this time it’s bloodstained… GET IT?)
Thoughts??
Giving credit where it’s due, this episode was directed by David Petrarca…  Considering the shoddy treatment the Hound got on this show at the hands of D&D, both as a character and in his relationship with Sansa, it’s nice to see these little subtle nods from the director(s). Kudos, sir!


This shot is amazing, because if this was a church, according to their position, Joffrey would be the priest, Sansa would be the bride, covered by white cloth, like a bride, and facing the altar, not the ceremony attendants. What is more shocking is Tyrion and Sandor’s position. In weddings, the bride’s father walks up the aisle offering his arm to his daughter until they get to the place in front of the altar where the bridegroom is waiting for her. If this was a wedding, Sandor is just in the place where the groom should be waiting for his bride, facing her as she approaches him.

katemarzullo:

I still have 20 minutes left of Game of Thrones Thursday, so I just wanted to quickly point out this shot… As a director, I am obviously very interested in shot composition, and this one recently got my attention. Specifically, the placement of each character in the frame (this is cropped a bit to illustrate my point). Sansa in the middle with her back to us — specifically her back draped in the Hound’s cloak. And Tyrion to her right, her future husband, helping her up, but the Hound placed right in the middle of them, directly facing Sansa (in fact they both seem deliberately angled toward one another). Then there’s Joffrey, her betrothed (at the time), to her left but the farthest figure in proximity to her. Interesting…

For those who have read the books, I’d like to point out the dream Sansa has that features all 3 of these men — you know the one I mean — in relation to the composition of this shot…

i read somewhere recently that his giving Sansa’s his cloak symbolized his shifting allegiance from Joffrey to her. There’s also the obvious reference — the “cloaking” of a bride by her groom at Westerosi wedding ceremonies. (In the books, he gives her his cloak again, at the Battle of Blackwater, only this time it’s bloodstained… GET IT?)

Thoughts??

Giving credit where it’s due, this episode was directed by David Petrarca…  Considering the shoddy treatment the Hound got on this show at the hands of D&D, both as a character and in his relationship with Sansa, it’s nice to see these little subtle nods from the director(s). Kudos, sir!

This shot is amazing, because if this was a church, according to their position, Joffrey would be the priest, Sansa would be the bride, covered by white cloth, like a bride, and facing the altar, not the ceremony attendants. What is more shocking is Tyrion and Sandor’s position. In weddings, the bride’s father walks up the aisle offering his arm to his daughter until they get to the place in front of the altar where the bridegroom is waiting for her.
If this was a wedding, Sandor is just in the place where the groom should be waiting for his bride, facing her as she approaches him.

Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC – 43 BC) Roman statesman and political thinker. (via philosophicalconservatism)
sansanfanart:

GoT-Sandor Clegane by Syvelli
kimberlite8:

An illustration from my upcoming Sansan illustrated novella, Marching Song. An epistolary smutfic with all illustrations by Bubug. Coming to fandom by Christmas 2014! You can read the WIP text on A03. Thank you for all your great reviews. Here are some of my favorite comments from the latest, Chapter 6:
zsra187: I didn’t think you could ever write anything hotter than Running Hunting, but you’ve managed it. Jesus Christ, this was so fucking hot
snuhutek:  and when I thought nothing can make me blush anymore, here you came. wow much hot. so sexy. such rude but so sweet.
coveredincleganedna: I’m in a smut daze. Who knew a letter could turn me (and Sandor and Sansa) on so much!
@thecakeconundrum: This story is absolute perfection.I can’t begin to describe how excellently you’ve managed to portray both the lustful, desirous feelings Sandor has for Sansa, alongside the more poignant and meaningful emotions too.

kimberlite8:

An illustration from my upcoming Sansan illustrated novella, Marching Song. An epistolary smutfic with all illustrations by Bubug. Coming to fandom by Christmas 2014! You can read the WIP text on A03. Thank you for all your great reviews. Here are some of my favorite comments from the latest, Chapter 6:

zsra187: I didn’t think you could ever write anything hotter than Running Hunting, but you’ve managed it. Jesus Christ, this was so fucking hot

snuhutek:  and when I thought nothing can make me blush anymore, here you came. wow much hot. so sexy. such rude but so sweet.

coveredincleganedna: I’m in a smut daze. Who knew a letter could turn me (and Sandor and Sansa) on so much!

@thecakeconundrum: This story is absolute perfection.I can’t begin to describe how excellently you’ve managed to portray both the lustful, desirous feelings Sandor has for Sansa, alongside the more poignant and meaningful emotions too.